Friday, May 5, 2017

RIDING THE BOMB

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We are “THE WEAPON OF MASS DESTRUCTION”

Our economy is underwritten by war, weapons and killing.  We don’t want to know what is happening in our name, with our tax money, sustaining our lifestyle.

The question is not simply who benefits from the end result of the wars but from the total action of the wars.  The bottom line is the bottom line.   Our men and women have lined the coffers of big business and the very wealthy.  And often the result of the conflict also lines the coffers of big business and the very wealthy. While the common people live with wounds physical, psychological and spiritual.
Blinding ourselves, some of us gain employment, some gain access to materials and goodies from the low paying labor and natural resources purloined as a result of our bullying, aggressions and our arms sales.  Dulled by inertia, seduced by promises of “trickle down”, conned by propaganda, we are numbed by the narcotic of things.  Grabbing the coat tails and gladly distracted by the "red carpet glitter", we aspire to emulate the merchants and bankers of war.  And we keep silent.

  




THE MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX




THIS IS A CRITICAL VIDEO!
THESE KILLINGS WERE PLANNED
YEARS IN ADVANCE.

This video doesn't show up on the blog.
It can be seen quickly by clicking on the link.
Worth the time.

General Wesley Clark: Wars Were Planned
 - Seven Countries In Five Years
2.12




AGGRESSION, VIOLENCE, ASSAULT
IT IS SANITIZED,
SUBVERTED,
LIED BY OMISSION,
DELIVERED BY ALTERNATIVE FACT.


Many of us hide in entertainment and frivolity.



WE GO ON ABOUT OUR LIVES – PRIVILEGED, ENTITLED











The question:
What would happen to the economy 
of the United States (and the world)
if:
We didn’t make so many weapons
We didn’t sell so many weapons
We closed bases overseas
We closed bases here at home
We brought home and discharged many military personel
We reduced the military personel here at home
We took care of our wounded physically, mentally and spiritually
We didn’t buy so many natural resources for weapons manufacturing
We didn’t use so much energy (petroleum plus) for military purposes.
We didn’t shoot or explode so many weapons
We didn’t have so many lobbyist pushing for murder and mayhem.
What would happen?



Searching the internet for the far reaching tenacles of the military/industrial complex has been frustrating.  None of the questions above are answered directly.

The indirect and induced employment associated with the U.S. aerospace and defense industry is a minimum of 3.5 million jobs. ... However, the Department of Defense (DoD) reports that it employs 720,000 civilian employees and 2.2 million military personnel.

Military Economy: The Military and Defense Industry: An Economic ...

siteselection.com/issues/2012/sep/sas-military-economy.cfm

Defense Jobs Make up 10 Percent of U.S. Manufacturing Demand
Leaders from the aerospace and defense industry recently came together to promote the impact of their business on the economy at a summit in Washington, Reuters reports. For the nation's military contractors, the event was an important public relations push as Congress looks to reduce the budget deficit by cutting spending in many avenues, including to defense spending.
Industry experts highlighted that approximately 800,000 defense jobs, intelligence jobs and other occupations are tied to the defense industry. In addition, more than 10 percent of U.S. manufacturing demand in the U.S. is dependant on aerospace and defense spending with contractors including Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics.
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, wage and salary employment in the federal government is expected to increase by 10 percent through 2018 and demand is projected to be particularly strong for workers with skills in specialized areas that require security clearance, including financial services, scientific research and information security. Job growth is also expected in employment through defense contractors as long as government spending remains consistent. 

http://www.clearedconnections.com/security-clearance-news/security-clearance/defense-jobs-make-up-10-percent-of-u-s-manufacturing-demand.htm


The Military and Defense Industry: An Economic Force in the U.S.
The military and defense industry is a significant driver of economic development in communities throughout the country. The positive benefits from military installations impact every citizen.
Often overlooked, the companies that support the military are major employers and tax generators. A report prepared by Deloitte and sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) earlier this year assessed the contribution and financial impact of the U.S. aerospace and defense industry. The indirect and induced employment associated with the U.S. aerospace and defense industry is a minimum of 3.5 million jobs.
The companies providing these jobs generated $324 billion in sales revenue in 2010, with $15.6 billion in net income after tax at an average pre-tax reported operating profit margin of 10.5 percent.
http://siteselection.com/issues/2012/sep/sas-military-economy.cfm

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One soldier, one year: $850,000 and rising

By Larry Shaughnessy
Keeping one American service member in Afghanistan costs between $850,000 and $1.4 million a year, depending on who you ask. But one matter is clear, that cost is going up.
During a budget hearing today on Capitol Hill, Sen. Kent Conrad, D-North Dakota, asked Department of Defense leaders, "What is the cost per soldier, to maintain a soldier for a year in Afghanistan?" Under Secretary Robert Hale, the Pentagon comptroller, responded "Right now about $850,000 per soldier."
http://security.blogs.cnn.com/2012/02/28/one-soldier-one-year-850000-and-rising/





THE WOUNDS OF “WAR” - PHYSICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL, SPIRITUAL,
AND FATAL ARE A POWERFUL EXPRESSION OF VIOLENCE.
THEY CANNOT BE DISMISSED ALTHOUGH THEY ARE KEPT FROM
SIGHT BY DISTRACTIONS. SANITIZE, SUBVERTED, LIED BY OMISSION, DELIVERED BY ALTERNATIVE FACT AND ACTIVE COMPARMENTALIZING.




 

THE TENTACLES GO OUT FROM HERE






  










This video doesn't show up on the blog.
It can be seen quickly by clicking on the link.
Worth the time.


This week Goldman Sachs put out a list of companies
that get 20 percent or more of their sales from the
government. The names on the list aren't shocking,
but the percentages are.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BENNmooFtFM&feature=youtu.be
3.32





for-raytheon-support-our-brave-6727110







SOME ENERGY USAGE
The United States Department of Defense is one of the largest single consumers of energy in the world, responsible for 93% of all US government fuel consumption in 2007 (Air Force: 52%; Navy: 33%; Army: 7%. Other DoD: 1%).

The Department of Defense uses 4,600,000,000 US gallons (1.7×1010 L) of fuel annually, an average of
12,600,000 US gallons (48,000,000 L) of fuel per day.

A large Army division may use about 6,000 US gallons (23,000 L) per day. According to the 2005 CIA World Factbook, if it were a country, the DoD would rank 34th in the world in average daily oil use, coming in just behind Iraq and just ahead of Sweden.


The U.S. military is the largest institutional consumer of oil in the world. Every year, our armed forces consume more than 100 million barrels of oil to power ships, vehicles, aircraft, and ground operations—enough for over 4 million trips around the Earth, assuming 25 mpg. 
transportation-solutions/us-military-oil-use.html




RESOURCES, ESPECIALLY OIL, MOTIVATE ALL THIS AGGRESSION. IT IS BOOSTERED BY CORPORATE AMBITIONS AND BOTTOMLINES.



There is the great
unbalance of
inequality.
It is its own violence





























Thursday, May 4, 2017

SOMETHING OF VALUE

The statement I am quoting below opened an interesting awareness for me.

“The point is if we remove some species from a natural system, or change the relationships in that system from how they have developed over time, we need to carry out the functions of the species we have removed.”

This is found on page 135. David Waltner-Toews.  2013. The Origin of Feces.This book is a fascinating exploration of human and animal waste through history to the present.

When I read this, I thought about ― Robert Ruark's, Something Of Value: “When we take away from a man his traditional way of life, his customs, his religion, we had better make certain to replace it with SOMETHING OF VALUE.” I equated this with the natural world where we live.

From the quote, I came to this understanding. For our needs, we humans use our technologies to alter the structures and functions of an environment. For our purposes, we disrupt or remove the interactions of the organic and inorganic components that have been established in a habitat. Our actions penetrate deep in time and space across multiple levels. To minimize or if possible to forestall unintended consequences, we must replicate/mimic the ecological situation we have assaulted.

This has not been our history. We use, deplete, contaminate, throw away and move on.

 Could we truly replicate what has been lost? We could try. This would initiate the same hubris and arrogance that has led us to blindly desecrate the natural world. It would be a caricature of an intricate, living web. Time would enliven it, but it would be other.